NASA unveils breathtaking shot of the ISS passing in front of the sun

It’s a stunning view of the International Space Station moving in front of the Sun. Photographer Joel Kowsky has managed to immortalize the structure in transit in front of the luminous star. An impressive composite image to discover below.

The ISS passing in front of the sun

Thomas Pesquet and his fellow astronauts have not been idle since their arrival aboard the ISS on April 23. Just recently, the Frenchman and his colleague Shane Kimbrough went out into space to install a new solar panel to supplement the station’s power supply. While the two astronauts were therefore out, the ISS moved in front of the Sun.

What did not escape Joel Kowsky, photographer of NASA. This one managed to capture the silhouette of the ISS taking shape in front of our star at the time of transit. Its speed was then about eight kilometers per second. Note that this is not a single shot but a composite image made from seven images. You can admire the result above and at the end of this article.

Read also >> Thomas Pesquet will be the next commander of the International Space Station

The ISS in front of the sun: a magnificent shot!

Either way, photographing such transits is far from an easy task. And for good reason, they are very fleeting to the point that the photographer must have perfect timing. The weather conditions must also be suitable. On Twitter, Joel Kowsky pointed out that his image had been “Fun to hunt”. For its part, the space agency also shared a GIF version of the International Space Station moving in front of the Sun. This makes it possible in particular to see in which direction it is heading.

For information, this is obviously not the first time that such a composite image has been produced. In 2016, Joel Kowsky (again him) had managed to take splendid pictures of the ISS in transit in front of the sun. And combine them to form a breathtaking composite image.

To follow the position of the International Space Station live, it’s here. We present to you the Spot The Station tool from NASA or the ISS tracker from Esa.

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